© 2020 by M Baldwin.

Thomas Paul Chipp (1793–1870): a provisional catalogue of his published harp music

Updated: May 16, 2019


The Theatre Royal, Covent Garden, as rebuilt in in 1809, where Thomas Chipp played the harp in the orchestra from 1818 onwards. Engraving by Thomas Rowlandson (1756–1827) and Augustus Charles Pugin (1762–1832); Plate 100 of The Microcosm of London (1810).

This is a provisional catalogue, to which I invite additions and amendments, of the published harp music of Thomas Paul Chipp (1793 – 1870). It includes 32 publications (separate works and small collections) from Chipp's lifetime, a few of which, such as Jock o'Hazledean and The minstrel boy, exist in more than one edition. One item, John Anderson my Jo!, known only from two published reviews, has not been traced. Of six items by Chipp which were published in the 1890s by Edwin Ashdown in the series A selection of favorite compositions for the harp, only one, the Fantasia [introducing] Had I a heart for falsehood framed, has been identified in an earlier edition, and even that is known only from published reviews.


Biographical note



Chipp has not received much recent attention from biographers. His entry, by William Barclay Squire, in the Dictionary of National Biography (1885-1900), vol. 10, which is fundamental to our knowledge of him, is as follows:


‘CHIPP, THOMAS PAUL (1793 – 1870), musician, was born in London 25 May 1793. He was educated in the choir of Westminster Abbey and learnt the piano from Clementi, but in the early part of his life was distinguished as a performer on the harp, for which instrument he wrote several popular pieces. In 1818 he was engaged by Sir Henry Bishop for the orchestra of Covent Garden Theatre, and in 1826 by Monk Mason for Her Majesty’s Theatre [at that time, The King's Theatre, Haymarket]. In his later life he was well known as a drummer. For fifty-three years Chipp was a member of all the principal London orchestras. He played at the coronations of George IV, William IV, and Victoria. His last appearance in public took place at the Worcester Festival in 1866. He died at Camden Town on Sunday 19 June 1870, leaving two sons, Edmund Thomas [q. v.], and Horatio, a violoncellist.’

(The sources acknowledged by Squire are: [David] Baptie’s [A Handbook of] Musical Biography [London, 1883]; the Musical Times, vol. 14, 525; the Musical Directory (1870-1); and Miss Chipp [the subject’s daughter].)


Chipp's daughter Harriette (or Harriet) (b. 9 July 1830), also a professional musician, though acknowledged by Squire as an informant, was not deemed worthy of mention in the Dictionary alongside her brothers. By the time this was written, Thomas Paul Chipp was perhaps better remembered as the father of the recently deceased Edmund Thomas Chipp (1823 – 1886), a noted organist, composer, and, from his graduation in 1860, Cambridge Mus.D.


Thomas Paul Chipp gained his initial musical education as a chorister at Westminster Abbey; in January 1806, at the age of twelve, he sang, together with the Chapel Royal and the choirs of St Paul’s Cathedral, and St George’s Chapel, Windsor, at the funeral of Lord Nelson. It is not known from whom he learnt to play the harp; Neville Butler Challoner (1784 – after 1835), a well-established teacher, who played the harp in the Italian opera orchestra at the King's Theatre until at least 1823, where Chipp succeeded him in 1826, is a likely candidate. Chipp's keyboard skills, acquired through study with Clementi, stood him in good stead when, in later life, he served as an organist. From the ingenuity of his Opus 1, a trio for violin, viola and violoncello (published by the Royal Harmonic Institution ‘for the Author’ in c.1820), Chipp evidently had considerable compositional skill. However, no trace has been found of other ensemble works, including a string quintet in E minor (1836) and a quartet (1845), referred to by James D. Brown and Stephen S. Stratton in British Musical Biography (1897); it seems that they were not published.


In 1817 Chipp was elected to the professional membership of the Royal Society of Musicians of Great Britain, later joining the society’s Court of Assistants for Life. Other harpist members of the court were Neville Butler Challoner, who had been elected in 1806, John Parry (1776 – 1851), who followed Chipp in 1818, and John Thomas Weippert (1798 – 1843), in 1826. Later professional members who played the harp were Thomas Challoner (the son of Neville), elected in 1829, William Erat, the harpmaker, in 1831, and John Orlando Parry (1810 – 1879, the son of John) in 1835.


In the 1820s Chipp published a steady stream of solo works for the harp, mostly settings with several variations of currently popular song and dance melodies, often preceded by a bold, freely-composed introduction.


Home, sweet home, Henry R. Bishop's ... ballad ... arranged ... for the Harp ... by T[homas] P. Chipp (London: Goulding, D’Almaine, Potter & Co, [1823]).

Other publications included a fantasia for the harp, and harp accompaniments to songs. The name Chipp appears repeatedly in lists and catalogues of NEW HARP MUSIC appended to printed music, such as James Power’s multi-volume publication of A Selection of Irish Melodies, with symphonies and Accompaniments by John Stevenson and Characteristic Words by Thomas Moore (London: Power, 1808 onwards). This is an example from the 7th number:



In the early 1830s the flow of new publications of harp pieces by Chipp waned.



Authorship attribution


Until March 2019 the catalogue of the British Library attributed 25 publications of Thomas Chipp's harp music and his Trio op. 1 to Harriette Chipp, his daughter, in consequence of which, entries in the union catalogues Copac and WorldCat have also been faulty. The extent of Thomas's output had been concealed while that of Harriette’s appeared to be greatly exaggerated. The entries in the British library catalogue have now been amended (20 March 2019). The list of works presented here draws on all three of these catalogues and on those of several universities. To date, only the copies in the British Library, London, and those available online (identified below) have been consulted directly. The survival of a substantial proportion of the pieces in two bound collections in Scotland (in the Universities of St Andrews (11 items) and Glasgow (9 items)) is noteworthy.


Harriette (or Harriet) Chipp (b. 9 July 1830), daughter of Thomas Paul, with whom her father’s music has been confused, performed in London and the provinces (sometimes appearing as ‘Miss Chipp’) initially as a pianist and later as a singer, between the 1840s and 60s. In about 1854 she went to Italy, singing opera in Cagliari, Sassari, and Turin, and in the 1861 census she was back in London, married to the baritone Alberto Laurence; she sometimes appeared as Camilla Laurence (Ganzl, 2017). In 1871 she sang in New York, the following year in Britain again, and then back in New York. Her one known composition, a Fantaisie Transcription on airs from Verdi's Rigoletto for the Pianoforte, was published in London by Duncan Davidson & Co. [1879]. Conceivably the publication at the end of the nineteenth century, after a gap of some seventy years, by Edwin Ashdown of several hitherto unpublished harp pieces by Thomas Chipp might be due to Harriette.



Publishers


Chipp’s first publishing associations, from 1820, were with The Royal Harmonic Institution and James Power, one of two Irish brothers, makers of military instruments, who initiated the publication of Thomas Moore’s Irish Melodies with music by John Stevenson (1761 – 1833). James Power was based in London, his brother William in Dublin. The range of Chipp’s publishers expanded, at the rate of about one per year, to include many of the major music sellers of the time: Baldwin, Cradock and Joy in 1822; Chappell & Co., and Goulding, D’Almaine, Potter & Co. in 1823; Addison & Beale (later to be joined by Cramer) in 1824; Latour in 1826; Willis & Co. in 1827; and, in about 1830, Welsh, and Monro & May. (Not all of his publications have been precisely dated; more work is needed on this.)


In [1834] Chappell appended a one-page 'Catalogue of Harp Music' (p. 6) to the Marche à la Grecque: for the harp … by M. A. Dibdin (London: Chappell, 50 New Bond Street, [1834]) (British Library h.108.(16.); it lists as available these seven works by Chipp:


Variations on “The soldier’s return” (published by Chappell & Co, [1824]).

Variations on “Hanoverian Air” (published by Chappell & Co., [1823]).

Variations on Irish Air, The Moreen, or Minstrel boy (published by Latour, [1826]; no edition by Chappell identified).

Variations on 2d d[itt]o Old Woman, or Love’s Young Dream ('Love’s Young Dream' was included in A Selection of National and Popular Melodies, arranged in a familiar style for the harp by T.P. Chipp. Book 10, published by Power, [183-?]; no edition by Chappell identified).

Variations on “Wapping old Stairs” (published by Latour, [1827]; no edition by Chappell identified).

Rondo on “Where the bee sucks” (published by Chappell & Co, [1824]).

“All by the shady Greenwood” from [“]Maid of Judah” (published by Chappell, [1830]).


That two Latour editions from the period 1826-30, when he carried on a separate business from Samuel Chappell, were available from Chappell a few years later is explained by Latour having sold his business to his former partner in 1830. There is no indication that Chappell issued separate editions of these works. It appears that the work abbreviated as Variations on 2d d[itt]o Old Woman, or Love’s Young Dream was a Chappell publication, distinct from Power's, which has not been traced.



Critical reception


The reviewing of smaller publications was patchy at the time but several items by Chipp were considered in the periodical music press. A review of two of his pieces (John Anderson my Jo! Scotch Air, with Variations for the Harp ... (London: Power, 1822), and The last Rose of Summer, with Variations for the Harp ... (London: Power, 1822), in The Quarterly Musical Magazine and Review, vol. 4 (London: Baldwin, Cradock and Joy, 1822), pp. 86-87) is preceded by high-toned socioeconomic observations and recommendations which shed light on attitudes to the harp:


‘… We parallel [the Marquis of Londonderry’s] inferences from the productiveness of revenue by the rapid introduction of harps, pedal and dital—the lowness of prices, by the multiplication of professors, and the agricultural distresses which the Noble Lord attributes to abundance, appear to us to be typified by the prolific powers of the Royal Harmonic Institution, and the superfructification of the half-price music shops…’

‘But previous to the establishment of this much desiderated system, the multiplication of harp music certainly proves the expansion and opulence of the musical classes. Those attributes of grace and supremacy which so peculiarly adapt this instrument to beauty of person and elegance of manner in the performer, and which demand also a certain degree of affluence to enable the possessor to support the continually recurring expense, have proved its strongest recommendations to the world of fashion and of taste, and a corresponding augmentation of music for the harp sufficiently marks its influence and the extension of its circle.

‘The publications at the head of our article are directed to the purposes of art in several separate gradations. The first of MR. CHIPP'S (dedicated to Master JOHN Rush—how low is this rage of dedication to descend?) is an easy and pretty lesson for those in a not very advanced stage of pupillage. The variations are in the common forms, but melodious and pleasing. The last Rose of Summer is better in every sense. Indeed the theme is in itself so sweet that it cannot fail to convey a great portion of its own beauty, wherever it is mingled with the paraphrase; and though it has the common fault of most variations, being cast into set forms that are wore very thread-bare, yet it is attractive.’


A shorter review of the same pair of pieces in The London Magazine, vol. 5, no. 27, March 1822 (Baldwin, Cradock, and Joy), p. 289, is likewise critical of stereotyped variation:


John Anderson my Jo, and The last Rose of Summer, with variations by Chipp, are of the same description. [The previous piece reviewed, Dizi's arrangement of O softly sleep, is described as 'an elegant little piece. The introduction is very graceful and the air judiciously treated. It is by no means difficult ...'] The variations of these two Airs bear too near a resemblance; the fourth of the one, and the fifth of the other, are precisely the same in their structure.’

Chipp’s Fantasia for the Harp, in which is introduced the Air “Had I a heart for falsehood framed,” ... (London: Addison and Beale, [1824]) was reviewed in The Harmonicon, vol. 2 (1824), pp. 209-10:


‘The Fantasia does its author credit: the delicious Scotch air is given as a theme, simply and with judgment; though some of the variations are at open war with the character and design of the melody. Let the reader imagine the exceedingly pathetic strain, “One morning very early,” played Allegro con fuoco, in two-four time!’


Although the Harmonicon was sympathetic to British music there are already signs that the reviewers, increasingly inclined to favour progressive continental works by Beethoven and Spohr, regarded Chipp’s manner as somewhat old-fashioned.



Performing career


Chipp’s first notable orchestral position was as harpist and timpanist in the orchestra of the Theatre Royal, Covent Garden: according to the 1818 salary list he earned £-/5/10 [a quarter of a guinea] per night playing the 'kettle drums and harp'. Perhaps on account of the intermittent nature of his role, this placed him in the lowest salary category, earning half as much as William Parke, the principal oboist. It was noted additionally that: ‘It is understood that Mr Chipp shall tune the Piano-fortes of the Theatre whenever required’ (Rohr, 2001, 123). Chipp succeeded Charles Meyer, John Erhardt Weippert, and John Michael Weippert who, successively, had played the harp, when needed, at Covent Garden from 1791 onwards.


The ledgers of Jacob Erat, harpmaker, spanning the years 1821-23 include several transactions with Chipp. In February 1821 he bought a new black single-action harp (no. 1380), 'in oil gold - £47/5/0', the address being 'Plumbtree Street', Bloomsbury; and a second-hand single-action (no. 834). The former Plumtree Street was the next thoroughfare to the west of Museum Street (formerly called Peter Street), which extends from the British Museum southwards to Drury Lane. In April of the same year Chipp, again at Plumtree Street, was charged 2 gns for 'repairing the wood work and varnishing and gilding, and regulating the machinery and pedals of harp'. Curiously, a succession of large string orders (by the 'bundle' of 30 strings), from April to September the same year, had a Museum Street address. (It is not clear whether Chipp had two premises simultaneously or in succession, or whether the two nominally neighbouring addresses somehow pertained to a single location.) Museum Street would have been a very convenient base for a musician playing regularly in the patent theatres, nearby to the south. When, in December 1823, Erat made for Chipp 'a new foot to harp, -/5/-', the address given was Dean Street [Soho].


Although concert reviews only rarely mentioned particular orchestral players, Chipp is occasionally named as playing an obligato or as accompanist, as in this concert at Worcester, the first in which Maria Malibran appeared there:


Review (excerpt) of a concert in the College Hall, Worcester, Worcester Journal, 16 September 1830, p. 3.

Occasionally Chipp's expertise as a timpanist is remarked upon alongside admiration of his harp playing, as when played in the opening concert of the 1834 Hull Festival:

Review (excerpt) of performance in the 1834 Hull Festival of Neukomm's oratorio The Mount Sinai, Hull Packet, 26 September 1834, p. 3.

He was sometimes called upon to play both instruments in the same festival; in the second concert of the same Hull festival, his playing in Neukomm's Napoleon's midnight review was remarked upon:


Review (excerpt) of a concert in the New Music Hall, Hull, 24 September 1834; Hull Packet, 26 September 1834, p. 3.

And the same partnership of Harper and Chipp received high praise in the third concert, Handel's Messiah.


Such versatility was a professional advantage, especially in the provinces, but in London concerts from the mid-1830s, Chipp increasingly specialised in the drums, while Mr Stockhausen or Mr Wright played the harp.



In the ‘List of Professors and Teachers of Music, in and near the Metropolis’ appended to The Apollonicon; or, Musical Album in 1832, Chipp’s address is given as Augusta Cottage, Park Village, Regent’s Park. Park Village, created in the 1820s by John Nash, was part of the master plan for Regent’s Park. It has not proven possible to identify Augusta Cottage, and the relationship of this address to that at which Chipp lived in 1841 (census), in nearby Albany Street (the street running parallel to the east side of the park, which ends to the north at Park Village), is unclear. After addresses in Bloomsbury and Soho, the village would have afforded space, light, quiet, and cleaner air.


Park Village West, Regent’s Park, London.

Although Chipp appears as a professor of the harp in the list it seems that soon after that date he stopped publishing new music for the instrument. There is no indication in his music that he adopted or wrote specifically for the double-action harp, and it is possible that his style of playing and composition for the instrument gradually became outmoded. As a performer he became, for several decades, the foremost timpanist in Britain. An editorial footnote to an account contrasting orchestral performance in Germany and London, in Leaves from the Journals of Sir George Smart (Smart, 1907), stresses the length of Chipp’s career and vividly recalls his presence on the platform:

‘… Born in 1793, he was a member of the London orchestras from 1818 to 1870 [sic], and was a well-known figure at the Sacred Harmonic Society’s concerts in the centre of the orchestra, with his two great drums before him and a kettle-drum at the side. He was short of stature and had a marvellous way of throwing himself on the drums when he wished to suddenly silence them.

William Henry Grattan Flood, too young himself to have witnessed Chipp, in The Story of the Harp (1905) is among the last to recall him:


‘Thomas Paul Chipp deserves notice as a remarkable English harpist. He first saw the light in London, in 1793, and studied the harp when quite a child. In 1[8]20 [sic] he was appointed harpist to Covent Garden Theatre, and published some pieces for his instrument. He is better remembered as the player of the “Tower drums,” and as father of the late Dr. E. T. Chipp. His death occurred on June 19th, 1870, four years after his retirement.’


Numerous accounts of orchestral performance and lists of the members of orchestras attest to Chipp’s ubiquity, until 1866, as player of the kettle drums and ‘tower drums’. He played the ‘double drums’ (the term used since Handel's time for the largest of kettle drums) at the funeral of Carl Maria von Weber in 1826 (Wyndham, 1906), and in the great Royal Music Festival of 1834 in Westminster Abbey:


‘The Royal Musical Festival in Westminster Abbey’. The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, vol. 24, no. 670, 5 July 1834 (London: Limbird), p. 1.

Here Chipp is listed at the end of the final part of the list of the vast orchestra:


‘Orchestra for the Royal Music Festival, Westminster Abbey’, The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, vol. 24 vol. 24, no. 670, 5 July 1834 (London: Limbird), pp. 18-19.

In the same year Chipp pioneered the use of kettle drums which could be tuned more efficiently using one rather than many screws:


Supplement to the Musical Library (London: Knight, 1834), p. 88.

Nonetheless, the life of an orchestral musician was a precarious one and Chipp also took positions as a church organist. By 1843 he had apparently diversified further: The Post Office London Directory (London: Kelly, 1843) lists Thomas Paul Chipp as ‘Bookseller, 109 Albany Street, Regent’s Park’, an address very close to – if not the same as – that at which he taught in 1832. This was the time at which Edmund Chipp, Thomas's son, who had gained his initial musical education in as a Chapel Royal Chorister under William Hawes, and studied the organ with George Cooper, Snr (organist at St Paul’s), embarked on his own musical career), playing at the organ at the Albany Chapel, Regent's Park, and – following his father – at the Italian Opera House, Haymarket. After an influential period in Belfast he became, from 1867, Chief Organist and choirmaster at Ely Cathedral.


The date of Thomas Chipp’s move to Camden Town, where he died, has yet to be ascertained. He seems to have ended his life in poverty: when, upon retiring in 1866 at the age of 73 he applied for aid to the Royal Society of Musicians, to which he had been elected 49 years earlier, he reported having £2 in a savings bank and less than £5 cash (Rohr, 2001, 162). The Chipp family plot in Highgate Cemetery is grave 318, west side.



References


Royal Society of Musicians of Great Britain, 1843 (London: Woodfall, 1843), p. 19.

William Barclay Squire, ‘Chipp, Thomas Paul’, and ‘Chipp, Edmund Thomas’, Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900, vol. 10.


James D. Brown and Stephen S. Stratton, British Musical Biography: A Dictionary of Musical Artists, Authors and Composers … (Birmingham: Stratton, 1897).


William Henry Grattan Flood, The Story of the Harp (London: Scott, 1905), pp. 164-165.


Henry Saxe Wyndham, The Annals of Covent Garden Theatre from 1732 to 1897 (London: Chatto & Windus, 1906), p. 41.


Sir George Smart, Leaves from the journals of Sir George Smart [edited by] H. Bertram Cox and C. L. E. Cox (London: Longmans, Green, & Co., 1907), p. 313.


Deborah Rohr, The Careers of British Musicians, 1750–1850: A Profession of Artisans (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001).


José Hopkins, Edmund Thomas Chipp: 'A life that led melodious days’ (Cambridge: Cambridge Editions, 2013).


Kurt Ganzl, Victorian Vocalists (London: Routledge, 2017).


Acknowledgement


I am grateful to Mike Baldwin for appending his transcription of the Erat ledger entries pertaining to Chipp to Lewis Jones, A List of Professors and Teachers of Music, in and near the Metropolis [of London] (1832) (blog, 15 March 2019).

Provisional catalogue of published harp music by Thomas Paul Chipp



The Banks of Allan Water, with an Introduction & Variations for the Harp (London: J. Power, [1820?])

Notes: plate no. 502; p. 1: catalogue of ‘New Piano-Forte Works, published by James Power’.

9 pages.

British Library g.661.b.(40.) and h.184.a.(14.) (a copy printed from the same plates but with the watermark date 1824); Det Kongelige Bibliotek, Copenhagen; scanned digital copy:

https://imslp.org/wiki/Special:ImagefromIndex/96963/torat


The Legacy, from Moore's Irish Melodies, with Introduction and Variations for the Harp (London: J. Power, [1820?]).

Notes: ‘inscribed to Miss Emma Bruguier by T.P. Chipp, Professor of the harp at the Theatre Royal Covent Garden’’; plate number 515 (shortly after The Banks of Allan Water, numbered 502).

9 pages.

British Library g.661.b.(41.) and h.2605.ii.(4.).


[Irish and Scottish airs, &c., arr. with introductions and variations for the harp, no. 1 - 6]. (London: [s.n.] [ca. 1820-26]).

Notes: the relationship of these numbered items to others by Chipp has yet to be investigated. Bodleian Library, Oxford.

The Last Rose of Summer [by Thomas Moore], with Variations, for the Harp (London: J. Power, [1822]). Notes: ‘Composed & inscribed (by permission) to Lady Elizabeth Carnegie by T.P Chipp … Professor of the harp at the Theatre Royal Covent Garden’. Poem by Thomas Moore published in A Selection of Irish Melodies, vol. 5 (1813); traditional melody, ‘Aislean an Oigfear’ (‘The Young Man's Dream’), transcribed by Edward Bunting in 1792 from the playing of Denis Hempson at the Belfast Harp Festival, published in A General Collection of the Ancient Irish Music (1796). Publication reviewed in The Quarterly Musical Magazine and Review, vol. 4 (London: Baldwin, Cradock and Joy, 1822), pp. 86-87. 9 pages. British Library h.2605.x.(4.); Brigham Young University International Harp Archive; scanned digital copy: https://archive.org/stream/lastroseofsummer00chip#mode/2up


John Anderson my Jo! Scotch Air, with Variations for the Harp, composed by T. P. Chipp, Professor of the Harp at the Theatre Royal, Covent Garden (London: Power, 1822).

Notes: publication reviewed in The Quarterly Musical Magazine and Review, vol. 4 (London: Baldwin, Cradock and Joy, 1822), pp. 86-87.

No location known.

Charlie is my darling; a Scottish melody, as sung by Miss Stephens on the opera of Montrose, arranged with variations for the harp by T. P. Chipp (London: Royal Harmonic Institution, [1822]) Notes: plate no. 1116; ‘dedicated to Miss Love, by T.P. Chipp. Professor of the Harp at the Theatre Royal Covent Garden’; catalogue of harp music. 7 pages. British Library h.152.(10.); University of St Andrews.


A favorite Hanoverian air with introduction and variations for the Harp (London: Chappell & Co., [1823]).

Notes: plate no. 2146; ‘composed & dedicated to Miss Jopson by T.P. Chipp.’ 9 pages. British Library h.152.(11.); University of St Andrews; University of Glasgow.

A favorite German Waltz, with variations for the harp by T. P. Chipp (London: Royal Harmonic Institution, [1823]). Notes: plate no. 1202; ‘dedicated to Miss Allanson by T.P. Chipp. Professor of the Harp, at the Theatre Royal Covent Garden.’

7 pages.

British Library h.152.(9); University of St Andrews; University of Glasgow.


My love is like the red red rose; a Scottish melody, with an introduction and variations for the harp (London: Royal Harmonic Institution, [1823]). Notes: plate no. 1268; poem by Robert Burns, set by William Knyvett (1803). 7 pages.

British Library h.152.(14.); University of St Andrews; University of Glasgow.


Home, sweet home, H. R. Bishop's ... ballad ... arranged with an introduction and variations, for the harp (London: Goulding, D'Almaine, Potter & Co., [1823]). Notes: ‘Dedicated to Miss M. Tree ...’; song by Sir Henry Rowley Bishop, to libretto of John Howard Payne's Clari, or the Maid of Milan (1823). Publication reviewed in The Harmonicon, vol. 1 (London: Pinnock, 1823), p. 114. 7 pages.

British Library g.661.(14.); National Library of Australia, Canberra;

Digital copy: http://access.bl.uk/item/viewer/ark:/81055/vdc


Where the bee sucks; a favorite air, arranged for the harp by T. P. Chipp (London: Chappell & Co, [1824]).

Notes: plate no. 2442; harp arrangement of song by Thomas Augustine Arne (1710-1778), from The Second Volume of Lyric Harmony (London, 1746), setting William Shakespeare (1564-1616), The Tempest, IV:i.

7 pages. British Library h.152.(13.); University of St Andrews; University of Glasgow; University of California, Berkeley.

Ye banks and braes [o' bonnie Doon]; a Celebrated Scotch air, arranged with an introduction and variations for the harp ... by T. P. Chipp (London: Addison & Beale, [1824]).

Notes: plate no. 25; ‘most respectfully inscribed to Miss Isabelle Mary Elderton’. Song to words by Robert Burns; melody by James Miller.

7 pages. British Library h.152.(17.); University of St Andrews; University of Glasgow.

The Soldier's return; a Scotch air, with introduction and variations for the harp (London: Chappell & Co, [1824]). Notes: plate no. 2568; ‘composed & most respectfully inscribed to Miss M. Tree by T.P. Chipp.’

9 pages. British Library h.152.(12.); University of St Andrews; University of Glasgow.


Fantasia for the Harp, in which is introduced the Air “Had I a heart for falsehood framed,” composed for Miss Sharp, by T. P. Chipp (London: Addison and Beale, [1824])

Notes: publication reviewed in The Harmonicon, vol. 2 (1824), pp. 209-10. The song introduced, ‘Had I a Heart for Falsehood Framed’, set verses by Richard Brinsley Sheridan, from The Duenna.

No location of this edition known, but republished in the 1890s by Ashdown as no. 3 in the series A selection of favorite compositions for the harp.


My Heart is sair for somebody, a Scotch ballad, written by Robt Burns, with symphonies & accompaniments for the harp or piano forte, arranged ... by T. B. Chipp (London: J. B. Cramer, Addison & Beale, [1825]).

Notes: song with accompaniment; some vocal ornaments printed; later published ‘with introduction and variations for the harp’ [1827]. 4 pages. British Library h.1654.aa.(6.).

Jock o'Hazledean. A Scotch Ballad, written by Sir Walter Scott ... With Symphonies and accompaniment for the Piano Forte or Harp, arranged ... T. P. Chipp (London: Cramer, Addison & Beale, [1825?]).

Notes: song with accompaniment; treble part of introductory symphony marked ‘flute’; plate no. 256.

British Library H.1652.d.(37.) and h.1650.d.(8.) (a copy also from the same plates with no significant differences, but British Library gives the date [1835?]).

"My Heart is sair.” Scotch air, with introduction and variations for the harp (London: J. Power, [1827]).

Notes: plate no. 1076; earlier published as song with harp accompaniment [1825].

9 pages.

British Library h.2605.bb.(13).


A Selection of National and Popular Melodies, arranged in a familiar style for the Harp, by T. P. Chipp. Book 1 (London: J. Power, [1825?]). Notes: plate 784; unlike most of Chipp's harp settings, these are short, simple settings, without variation or decoration, all headed 'From Moore’s Selection of National Airs'. See also Book 10. British Library h.184.a.(15.).

Contents: Oft in the stilly night

Flow on, thou shining river

A temple to friendship

Those evening bells

Should those fond hopes

Reason, folly, and beauty


Oh! touch that harp: a cavatina, sung by Miss Love, at the Theatre Royal, Covent Garden, (accompanied on the harp, by Mr, Chipp.) (London: S. Chappell, [1826]

Notes: plate no. 3017; song by Jonathan Blewitt, described as ‘Mr Blewitt's cavatina, or rather cantata, to which it comes nearest’, in The Quarterly Musical Magazine and Review, vol. 8 (Baldwin, Craddock, and Joy, 1826), pp.119-120.

7 pages.

British Library h.1283.(19.); University of St Andrews.


A favorite Irish melody, with an introduction and variations for the harp composed ... by T.P. Chipp (London: F. T. Latour, [1826]). Notes: plate no. L.29; ‘dedicated to Miss Dibdin’; an arrangement of the air, ‘The moreen’, also known as ‘The minstrel boy’, with words by Thomas Moore.

11 pages. British Library h.152.(15.); University of St Andrews; University of Glasgow; University of California, Berkeley.

Another edition:

The minstrel boy, with introduction & variations (new ed.), included in the bound collection [Miscellaneous fantasias for harp solo by J. Balsir Chatterton, N. C. Bochsa and others] [ca.135p], Royal Academy of Music, London.


A celebrated Irish air, Sung by Mr Braham in the opera of Guy Mannering, with an introduction and variations [for the harp] by T. P. Chipp (London: F. T. Latour, [1826]).

Notes: song by Henry Rowley Bishop from Guy Mannering, or the Gipseys Prophecy, opera with libretto partly by Sir Walter Scott, first performed at the Covent Garden Theatre, London, on 12 March 1816.

9 pages. British Library h.152.(19.); University of St Andrews.


The Swiss Boy. A favorite Tyrolese air, arranged with an introduction & variations for the harp ... by T. P. Chipp (London, Dublin: I. Willis & Co, [watermark 1827]).

9 pages. British Library h.184.i.(14.).

Another edition: Worldcat lists a later American edition (New York: Browne & Buckwell, [185-?]), which has not been traced.


The favorite air "Wapping old stairs," [music by John Percy,] arranged with an introduction and variations for the harp by T. P. Chipp (London: F. T. Latour, [1827]).

Notes: plate no. L 305; ‘dedicated to his pupil Miss Brady by T.P. Chipp.’ 9 pages. British Library h.152.(16.); University of St Andrews; University of Glasgow.


Thou art gane awa’, Scotch air, with introduction and variations for the harp (London: J. Power, [watermark 1827]). 9 pages.

British Library h.1226.f.(13.).


I'd be a Butterfly, Mr Bayly's popular melody, arranged with an introduction and variations for the harp ... by T. P. Chipp (London, Dublin: I. Willis & Co, [1828]).

Notes: ‘dedicated to Miss Helen Fisher’. 9 pages.

British Library h.2604.c.(11.).


The favorite air "All by the shady greenwood tree” from the Opera of "The Maid of Judah,” arranged for the Harp by T. P. Chipp (London: S. Chappell, [1830]).

Notes: plate no. 3708; arrangement for harp of a song from The Maid of Judah, to a libretto after Sir Walter Scott's novel Ivanhoe, the music adapted to the English Stage by Rophino Lacy from the works of Rossini. 11 pages. British Library h.152.(18.); University of Glasgow.


Oh! no, we never mention her (Bishop), with introduction and variations for the Harp (London: Goulding & D'Almaine, [1830?]) Song by Henry Rowley Bishop (1786-1855); introduction and variations by T. P. Chipp. 5 pages. British Library g.661.(15.); scanned digital copy:

http://access.bl.uk/item/viewer/ark:/81055/vdc


The Deep deep Sea, a cavatina, composed and sung by C. E. Horn, arranged as a rondo for the harp, by T. P. Chipp (London: T. Welsh, [1830?]).

Notes: plate no. 3583. 7 pages.

British Library h.2605.bb.(14.).

A Selection of National and Popular Melodies, arranged in a familiar style for the harp by T.P. Chipp. Book 10 (London: J. Power, [183-?]).

Notes: unlike most of Chipp's harp settings, these are short, simple settings, without variation or decoration. Only books 1 and 10 of this series are known to exist.

8 pages.

National Library of Ireland, Dublin; University of California, Berkeley (not in British Library).

Contents: Prelude Love's young dream

Di tanti palpiti by Rossini Le petit tambour


The blue Bells of Scotland arranged for the Harp (London: [1852]).

Notes: song by Dorothy Jordan (1761-1816). British Library h.2604.(23.)


Eveleen's Bower (London: Addison, n.d.)

University of Edinburgh, Mus.f.92/10 

Rousseaus dream. With variations for the harp (London: Monro & May, n.d.).

Notes: 'composed & respectfully dedicated to Miss Louisa Smith by T.P. Chipp.' Melody by Jean-Jacques Rousseau, from Le devin du village (1752); Monro & May active from c.1823 until the Christie and Manson auction of their plates in 1848. 7 pages. Det Kongelige Bibliotek, Copenhagen; scanned digital copy at:

http://img.kb.dk/ma/umus/miss_somes-03.pdf

and: https://imslp.org/wiki/Special:ImagefromIndex/96964/torat


Six items in the Edwin Ashdown series: A selection of favorite compositions for the harp.

Numbers 1-6 of the series have an extensive 'Catalogue of Harp Solos' on the final page. That only no. 1, I love but thee, is included in it indicates that the series of pieces by Chipp was a recent addition to Ashdown’s catalogue.

A selection of favorite compositions for the harp, Nos. 1-6 ... by T. P. Chipp. (London: Edwin Ashdown). British library date is [ca. 1900] but plate numbers indicate slightly earlier.

Notes: plate no. E A. 18,024 Edwin Ashdown; plate nos. E.A. 23,690-23,693 Edwin Ashdown; plate no. E.A. 25,925 Edwin Ashdown.

British Library I.648.vv.(1.) to I.648.vv.(6.)


Two of the works issued by Ashdown for which no earlier exemplar has been found are among four works by Chipp included in a Willis & Co. catalogue of ‘new harp music’ on p. 8 of M. A. Dibdin, Introduction & Variations on an admired French Waltz. For the harp (London, Dublin: Willis & Co, [c. 1825]): Rondo on "Cherry Ripe" and Divertimento on "Hurrah for the Bonnets”.


I love but thee: variations, T. Moore, by T. P. Chipp (London; New York: Edwin Ashdown, [between 1889 and 1900]).

Series Title: A selection of favorite compositions for the harp, no. 1.

Notes: plate no. E A. 18024. 9 pages.

British Library I.648.vv.(1.); International Harp Archives at Brigham Young University; scanned digital copy: https://archive.org/stream/ilovebutthee00chip#mode/2up

No earlier source identified.


Cherry ripe: variations, C. E. Horn, by T. P Chipp (London; New York: Edwin Ashdown, [between 1889 and 1900]).

Series Title: A selection of favorite compositions for the harp, no. 2. Notes: original song by Charles E Horn; variations by T. P. Chipp; plate no. 23690.

9 pages.

British Library I.648.vv.(2.); International Harp Archives at Brigham Young University; scanned digital copy: https://archive.org/stream/cherryripe00chip#mode/2up

Apparently published by Willis & Co. before 1825 (listed in a Willis & Co. catalogue of ‘new harp music’ on p. 8 of M. A. Dibdin, Introduction & Variations on an admired French Waltz. For the harp (London, Dublin: Willis & Co, [c. 1825]); that edition not traced.


Had I a heart [for falsehood framed]: variations, Irish air, by T. P Chipp (London; New York: Edwin Ashdown, [between 1889 and 1900]).

Series Title: A selection of favorite compositions for the harp, no. 3.

Notes: plate no. E. A. 23692. Initially published as Fantasia for the Harp, in which is introduced the Air “Had I a heart for falsehood framed,” composed for Miss Sharp, by T. P. Chipp (London: Addison and Beale, [1824]), and reviewed in The Harmonicon, vol. 2 (1824), pp. 209-10. The song introduced, ‘Had I a Heart for Falsehood Framed’, set verses by Richard Brinsley Sheridan, from The Duenna. As the Addison and Beale edition has not been traced, the Ashdown edition is the only known source.

12 pages.

British Library I.648.vv.(3.)


Hurrah for the bonnets of blue: fantasia, Scotch air, by T. P. Chipp (London; New York: Edwin Ashdown, [between 1889 and 1900]).

Series Title: A selection of favorite compositions for the harp, no. 4.

Notes: plate no. 23692; this set of variations is called ‘Fantasia’ in the Ashdown series, while Had I a heart, originally published as ‘Fantasia’ in [1824], is not.

9 pages.

British Library I.648.vv.(4.); International Harp Archives at Brigham Young University; scanned digital copy: https://archive.org/stream/hurrahforbonnets00chip#mode/2up

Apparently published by Willis & Co. before 1825 (listed in a Willis & Co. catalogue of ‘new harp music’ on p. 8 of M. A. Dibdin, Introduction & Variations on an admired French Waltz. For the harp (London, Dublin: Willis & Co, [c. 1825]); that edition not traced.


Popular melodies varied, Book 1, by T. P. Chipp (London; New York: Edwin Ashdown, [between 1889 and 1900]).

Series Title: A selection of favorite compositions for the harp, no. 5.

8 pages.

Contents:

I’ve been roaming. Horn.

Why what can a poor maiden do. Horn.

Kelvin Grove. Scotch air [with 3 variations]

British Library I.648.vv.(5.)

No earlier source identified.


Popular melodies varied, Book 2, by T. P. Chipp (London; New York: Edwin Ashdown, [between 1889 and 1900]).

Series Title: A selection of favorite compositions for the harp, no. 6 (not listed on the title page of nos 1-5].

7 pages.

Contents:

Love good night. Hawes.

My lodgings on the cold ground [anon.] [with 3 variations]

Non piu andrai. Mozart.

Spanish air [anon]

British Library I.648.vv.(6.)

No earlier source identified.

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